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We need women in the United States who were diagnosed with ADH and then developed DCIS

We need women anywhere in the United States who were diagnosed first with atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and then, within the next five years, were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to participate in a research study exploring how breast cancer progresses.

By studying tissue samples, a research team at Boston Medical Center in Massachusetts discovered that many cancer-related genes and cell processes are altered in both atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The research team wants to learn more about these changes and how they vary in different types of breast tissue.

Please read on to learn more about what’s involved and who can participate. If this study isn’t a good fit for you, please pass it on to anyone you know who might be interested!

What’s the study about?

The research team is studying breast cells from biopsies of normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), and ductal carcinoma in situ(DCIS) to learn more about breast cancer progression. The research team will study biological markers (molecular characteristics or substances) to learn how they vary among the three different types of tissue.

What’s involved?

If you agree to participate in the Genetic Analysis of Breast Biopsies study (IRB # H-29960) you will be asked to fill out a questionnaire about your family history [family cancer history, BRCA status (if known)] and details of your health history [information concerning your atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situdiagnoses]. You will receive and then return this questionnaire by mail (at no cost to you). You will then be asked to obtain from your doctor or pathologist pathology slides and tissue blocks from both your ADH and DCIS surgeries. [You will be given a detailed instruction sheet to give to your doctor or pathologist to explain what is needed and why.] You or your doctor/pathologist will mail these items to the researcher, at no cost to you. If you prefer, you can give the research team permission to request the pathology slides and tissue blocks from your doctor or pathologist.

The researchers need to enroll 40 women in this pilot study.

Who is conducting the study?

Pamela Larson, PhD, at Boston Medical Center

Where?

Anywhere in the US (all participation is handled in the mail)

Who can participate?

You can join the Genetic Analysis of Breast Biopsies study, if you match ALL of these MAIN categories:

• You are a woman between the ages of 39-65

• You were diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) after July 2006

• You were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within 1-5 years of the original atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosis. The DCIS and ADH MUST have been in the same breast.

• You were diagnosed ONLY with ductal carcinoma in situ with NO evidence of either invasive ductal or lobular cancer

• You know the receptor status of your DCIS diagnosis: the research team needs women diagnosed with estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor positive, and Her2/neu positive DCIS (ER+/PR+/Her2+)

• You did NOT receive breast therapy (i.e. radiation, chemotherapy, or tamoxifen) between the atypical ductal hyperplasia surgery and the ductal carcinoma in situ surgery. It is OK if you had treatment after surgery for your DCIS diagnosis.

• You have NOT tested positive for a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation (if known)

• You were NOT using birth control pills or menopausal hormone therapy when you were diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia or ductal carcinoma in situ

• You were NOT pregnant or breastfeeding when you were diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia or ductal carcinoma in situ

• You live in the United States

After you RSVP, the research team will contact you to ask additional questions to be sure that this study is a right fit for you.

YES, SIGN ME UPYes, Sign Me Up

NO, THANKSNo Thanks

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